image_pdfimage_print

ISRO successfully tests indigenous cryogenic engine and What Is cryogenic Engine

ISRO successfully tests indigenous cryogenic engine and What Is cryogenic Engine

india year book 2017
To Download This File In PDF Form -Click Here
To Download This File In PDF Form -Click Here
Download free Study Material From Here
  • Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) on 28 April 2015 successfully tested an indigenous cryogenic engine.
  • The powerful version of the cryogenic engine was tested successfully at ISRO’s propulsion complex at Mahendragiri in Tirunelveli district of Tamil Nadu.
  •  A team headed by Director D Karthikesan had led the testing.
  • This engine will allow launch vehicles to carry satellites of up to capacity of four tonnes in geostationary orbit.
  • It will also give boost to India’s interplanetary probes and manned space missions.
  • It is essential to master this technology for any space power as launching heavier satellites requires cryogenic engines even in the lower stages of the rocket.
  • It will also make India self-reliant in sending heavier satellites to the required orbits and eliminate need of dependence on foreign launch vehicles.
  • It should be noted that India sixth spacefarer after US, Russia, the European Space Agency, China and Japan to develop a cryogenic engine.
  • Earlier in January 2015, India had successfully launched GSLV-D5, the first successful launch vehicle with an indigenous cryogenic engine.
  • But it had capacity to launch satellites of up to two tonnes.
  • Now Indian Increased its Capacity to 4 Tonnes.
  • Now india Can Launch Heavy Satellites too In Space.

Facts about cryogenic engine

  • A cryogenic rocket engine is a rocket engine that uses a cryogenic fuel or oxidizer, that is, its fuel or oxidizer (or both) are gases liquefied and stored at very low temperatures.
  • Notably, these engines were one of the main factors of NASA’s success in reaching the Moon by the Saturn Vrocket.[1]
  • A cryogenic engine is more efficient as it provides more thrust for every kilogram of propellant burnt.
  • Cryogenic fuels are extremely clean as they give out only water while burning.
  • The engine uses liquid oxygen at -2530 C and liquid hydrogen at -1830C
  • It can develop the thrust needed in the final state of the rocket to put satellites, weighing two tonnes or more, into a geosynchronous orbit.
  • Cryogenic engines that give the most thrust, are usually required for the last stage of the rocket because this stage provides 50% of the velocity of 10.2 kms per second needed at the point of injection of a satellite.
  • It is needed because outside the atmosphere there is no oxygen and most regular fuels need oxygen to burn.
  • India wanted a vehicle that would be bigger, lighter and more efficient than its workhorse Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) to launch 2.5-tonne class of satellites and put them into a geostationary transfer orbit at 36,000km from Earth’s surface.
  • In response ISRO started the Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle(GSLV) programme
image_pdfimage_print